take something in one's stride

take something in one's stride deal with something difficult in a calm way.
Main Entry: stride

English terms dictionary. 2015.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • take something in one's stride — he seem to be taking the news in his stride Syn: deal with easily, cope with easily, not bat an eyelid …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • take something in one's stride — DEAL WITH EASILY, cope with easily, not bat an eyelid. → stride …   Useful english dictionary

  • take something in one's stride — verb Not to allow oneself to be set back, daunted, upset or embarrassed by unpleasant or undesirable circumstances …   Wiktionary

  • take something in one's stride (US also take something in stride) — deal with something difficult in a calm way. → stride …   English new terms dictionary

  • take something in stride — take something in (one s) stride deal with something difficult or unpleasant in a calm and accepting way we took each new disease in stride * * * take (something) in stride (US) (or Brit take (something) in your stride) : to deal with (something… …   Useful english dictionary

  • stride — ► VERB (past strode; past part. stridden) 1) walk with long, decisive steps. 2) (stride across/over) cross (an obstacle) with one long step. ► NOUN 1) a long, decisive step. 2) the length of a step or manne …   English terms dictionary

  • stride — verb (past strode; past participle stridden) 1》 walk with long, decisive steps. 2》 (stride across/over) cross (an obstacle) with one long step. 3》 literary bestride. noun 1》 a long, decisive step.     ↘the length of a step or manner of taking… …   English new terms dictionary

  • stride — 1. verb she came striding down the path Syn: march, pace, step 2. noun long swinging strides take something in one s stride Syn: (long/large) step, pace …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • stride — [strīd] vi. strode, stridden, striding [ME striden < OE stridan, akin to Ger streiten, to quarrel < IE * streidh < base * (s)ter , to be stiff, rigid > STARE, STARVE] 1. to walk with long steps, esp. in a vigorous or swaggering manner …   English World dictionary

  • take — I. verb (took; taken; taking) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English tacan, from Old Norse taka; akin to Middle Dutch taken to take Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. to get into one s hands or into one s possession, power, or… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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